Living Spaces

What is a living space?  See many examples below:

Click on any photo enlarge and to start a slideshow of all the images in this gallery.

Dining Spaces

Here are a few of the dining spaces that Emmet Carter has designed.  More photos in progress so check back often.

Click on any photo to enlarge and start a slideshow of all the images in this gallery.

Kitchen and Bath

Small to large, rustic to polished, Emmet Carter can design any style kitchen or bathroom that a client can imagine.

Click on any photo to enlarge and start a slideshow of all the images in this gallery.

Commercial Work

Emmet Carter has designed a variety of commercial projects including an Inn, rental apartments, two restaurants, and an office.  More photos are in progress so check back often.

Click on any photo to enlarge and to start a slideshow of all the images in this gallery.   

Before

Before and After

This is an important element of the Emmet Carter website available to show the viewer how far the designer is capable of taking a space.  We have chosen to showcase some of the more dramatic changes here so that you can see that the designer gets involved in all aspects of a renovation, new building project or addition (inside the walls and all).  In addition to designing all the interiors below, she created the construction, electric and finish plans for all of the featured spaces here that underwent construction.

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

Though the architect insisted that the existing kitchen be bumped out for a better lake view, and alternatively suggested putting it in the historic living room for an open kitchen and family space, we reminded him that we would not be disturbing the historic footprint of the Federal home and that the “family” consisted of two adults and a dog.  Therefore, though he thought the space entirely too small for a kitchen, it has been for many years the perfect size for two people who do a great deal of cooking and entertaining.  An eight-year old nephew chose the color, which reminded him of green apples and grapes. Around the green walls we added custom wheat board non-toxic cabinetry, trim with Federal details, and green granite that resembles marble. The floor is FSC beech wood.  We got the lake view by putting a second sink in the island, which faces onto the adjoining room’s lakefront windows.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

This office is part of a larger office space renovation for an educational non-profit that receives many visitors from around the country. The space was previously an apartment on the second story of a central village building. It features new efficient windows; custom local wood paneling and floors; and a locally hand-made desk, chairs and tables. The rooms reflect the local Adirondack vernacular.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

The clients wanted to expand the bedroom of this rental apartment   into the hall so we designed a plan that created a new bathroom and separate hall entrance so that the room could be part of a larger apartment space or rented alone.  Custom Adirondack local wood paneling, floors, and furniture serve as a warm reminder to the visitor of their unique location.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

This client wanted to turn an outdated, small, dark guest bath into a room that felt more spacious, bright, and inviting, while also accommodating older and handicapped visitors. Without adding any space we took out the old and cumbersome tub and expanded the shower space by stealing some unused floor space from the room. We added a shower light, and other warm efficient lights and updated the heat and venting.  The new lights, soothing sea green palette on the walls and hand-made tiles, and the glass enclosure visually enlarged the room. A local photograph of the outside lake with the same hues added to the warmth of the space and created a local context. To please the guests with physical limitations, a sturdy but elegant grab bar, a hand held shower with long hose and a generous shower seat did the job.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

This client wanted to turn an old Dairy barn into a three-bedroom guest house for visiting children, their spouses, and grandchildren.  They also wanted a gym for themselves and for their guests.  The original footprint and exterior walls were preserved while all interior walls were removed and re-configured, and the failing roof was carefully lifted and replaced. The old exterior windows were re-used for the interior walls of the gym to let light into the living room and to expand the space.  Radiant heat and new energy efficient windows, foam insulation, and wood stove ensured that the space would be efficient and comfortable in winter and summer alike.  A simple, rustic Adirondack theme was requested and durable furniture from a previous home was perfect for the space.  The result is an unpretentious and inviting space where parties abound and everyone feels welcome (see the plans in Design Process).


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

A former English professor and her well-read husband requested a more functional upstairs hallway in their historic Greek-Revival home. The tin ceiling remained, new lighting was added, and the four layers of historic wallpaper were preserved in a small corner for commemoration.  The floor-to-ceiling bookshelves were a logical first step to accommodate their large collection of books while an antique bench with custom organic cushion was enough to satisfy their young son for his reading endeavors.  As for the adults, they were surprised and delighted to learn that two upholstered, swivel reading chairs and two wall-mounted lamps were able to fit by their tall non-functioning French doors at the end of the hall.  Interlined mocha linen curtains were added to the doors to visually warm the space, block out winter drafts, and to afford privacy at night.  A formally little-used circulation space is now their favorite family room.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

We took out the dropped ceiling in this room, trimmed out the beams and added a good deal of built-ins for maximum storage and efficiency.  The solid wood bed and tables are made in nearby Vermont with a non-toxic natural oil finish while the chair is a re-upholstered antique, and the decorative dresser was made in India. All the paints are non-toxic and VOC free, all the fabrics are from natural fibers and the wool rug is completely non-toxic as well.  Since the stair to the attic is very narrow, a normal king mattress wouldn’t fit, so we purchased an organic natural rubber king one that comes in pieces, enabling easy transport up to the room.  The quiet room, surrounded by in-wall sugar beet foam insulation and the inviting bed, wrapped in soft organic fabrics, ensure that guests never want to leave.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

This bathroom seems very popular with guests.  The inspiration—from the owner’s love of the Caribbean sea and the Lake Champlain waters that lie beyond its walls—led to a water-like color scheme with recycled glass tiles and nautical fixtures.  The deep tub, hand friendly fixtures and large tiled surrounding allow easy bathing of visiting children and luxurious soaks for visiting adults (the floor features a suite of kid and adult guest rooms).  The double sink vanity features a clean white marble.  A separate third sink and toilet are down the hall allowing multiple guests access to sinks at the same time.  Everyone’s favorite feature is the recycled floor tiles, which, with rounded edges feel delightful under bare feet.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

This Federally inspired dining room was used as a wood shop by the previous owner. The Emmet Carter team designed all the custom federal-patterned trim in the room to honor the home’s original heritage.  As well, a bricked-in southern window was opened, the fireplace was restored to working condition, the mantel was dressed up with a federal wood surround and white marble; new FSC local cherry wood and an Aubusson reproduction rug grace the floors; taller, federal reproduction chairs and table and antique French case pieces enliven the room with quiet grandeur.  Additionally, new sugar beet foam insulation and green framing techniques brought the walls in by a foot and the ceiling down, but they allowed a formally drafty room to be comfortable in the winter despite brutal lake winds that beat at the panes.  Silk curtains lined with cotton English bump and historically inspired copper screens also block out the strong drafts.  The Tiffany blue color was inspired by a handful of cherished seaside paintings in the room by the owners’ two grandmothers.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

This room almost didn’t happen until the Emmet Carter team determined that a moldy crawl space, if properly excavated by hand, could become a finished basement.  A home gym and wine cellar were promptly requested. Two-foot brick walls ensure that the wine cellar remains nearly the same cool temperature year-round (no expensive air systems were needed).  The poured concrete floor was stained with a non-toxic brown stain and the wood trim and storage systems were custom-made with local FSC Douglas Fir and finished with a green linseed oil sealer.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

This basement gym began as a moldy crawl space below the living room.  When we removed the rotted living room floor, we decided that if we could excavate the foundation a new room could be created within the old foundation walls.  The space needed to be excavated by hand (see before picture above post-excavation), crumbling walls within the perimeter needed to be taken apart, and the foundation required a good deal of pointing, but in the end, the foundation became more stable and a beautiful new gym and wine cellar emerged (on the other side of the white door -see before and after images of the wine cellar in this section and see below for before and after pictures of the living room above the gym).  We poured a concrete floor over radiant heat and stained it with a dark, non-toxic product. We hired a very skilled woodworker to create the wood benches and storage bins around the room (and carefully cut the wood perimeters to fit the configurations of each stone).  The work of the space was laborious but well worth the effort to abate a mold problem and to gain much needed and usable space in the basement.  In the winter, the warmth from that space also ensures that the living room above never needs to have its heat turned on.  In the summer, the ground level space remains very cool so that no air system is needed for comfort.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

The floor of this gracious room, once a formal 19th century living room and later, in the 1950s and 60s, the pub room of a hotel, was collapsing into the foundation and so needed to be taken out and entirely re-built.  It was a laborious job but well worth the work. It is now a well-used entertaining space for small groups and large gatherings alike. The yearly 100 person dance party in the room can carry on with assurance of a sturdy base.  The detailed trim work and built-ins throughout the room were all new, customized to match existing Federal wood patterns in the home, and comprised of FSC woods.  The rugs are custom, hand made wool from Tibet; the floors are new FSC beech wood; the couches are custom and entirely organic; the upholstered chairs are sustainable from Lee; and the French chairs are antique and re-upholstered with a cotton velvet and a cotton jute batting.  The coffee table was handmade of walnut by the owner’s brother.  All the fabrics in the room are natural and organic and all the wood and paint finishes are natural and non-toxic.  Two original fireplaces transformed into gas stoves heat the room on demand for company and in-floor hydronic radiant heat stands by for additional warmth—though even in frigid winters it has never turned on because of the efficient and warm rooms that surround on all sides.  The neutral palette in the room and black and white art work let the architectural elements of the room take center stage, while elements like the textured trims and velvets invite touch and lingering.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

This eight foot wide new addition, in the footprint of an historic porch, now mirrors the existing wing on the other side of the house to add symmetry to the Federal house.  Additionally, it offers space for a bar, half bath, mudroom and staircase to the finished basement.  The double paned Marvin windows offer nice views of the lake and south yard, allow large amounts of sunlight to warm the house in winter, and large breezes to enter in the summer.  The new addition also insulates the large, historic living room.  The honed marble floors conceal efficient radiant heat, and the customized bar cabinet is recessed into the area where an exterior window once stood.  Recycled PaperStone tops the bar area and half bath vanity down the hall.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

This 1823 home took five years for the Emmet Carter team to restore.  The back ell of the house had been cut off by a previous owner who wanted less space in the home.  This left an interior wall posing as an exterior one for decades.  A poorly constructed north additon upset the classical symmetry of the house so it was re-built and another matching wing was added on the south side for balance, and to create needed space for  a mudroom, bar and new basement stairs.  A rear screened porch with upper deck off the master bedroom added some needed dimension to the rear of the home and offered two new lovely areas for relaxing.  The screened porch also has glass panels that replace the screens for all-year enjoyment.  The huge, hand-cut historic stones that marked the end of the cut-off ell (and served as its former foundation) now serve as a stone wall surround to a rear wood deck (in the former ell footprint).


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

This charming c. 1900 Arts & Crafts/Queen Anne residence was slated for demolition until the Emmet Carter folks decided to buy it and save it.  This charming residence is an exemplary fusion of classic architectural details and 21st century green contemporary lifestyle. All the original woodwork and windows were saved but the plumbing, electric, and all the inner workings were replaced.  Molded walls from years of entering rain were banished while quiet, textured fabrics and furniture and simple hand-made, non-toxic finishes allow the house’s simple, elegant character to shine.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

This bathroom was in dire condition before renovation.  Water had been leaking into the room for many years but the original turn of the century moldings and wood floors of the space were intact.  When we demolished the walls, we discovered a lovely brick façade where the chimney furnace traveled up to the roof.  We left it and the wood molding exposed and painted the original floorboards.  Formally a small bedroom, the space offered a generous amount of room for a bathroom, especially when the closet walls came down.  A large walk-in shower with hand-made Mexican tiles, a new deep soaking tub, wood blinds and lively color embolden but warm the space.  New fixtures, venting, lighting, insulation, electric and plumbing ensure that the space will function efficiently for years.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

Like the bathroom above, in the kitchen we exposed the brick wall of the furnace chimney and reworked the walls with proper insulation, new wiring and plumbing.  We had picked out local slate for the floors but discovered after removing the old vinyl tiles that a beautiful wood floor lay beneath.  We opted to sand the wood and seal it with a non-toxic protectant.  The resulting wood floor lends a linearity and warmth to the space.  The Green paint and cabinets combined with energy efficient but hard-working appliances, granite, lights and farmhouse sink meet the demands of a picky chef but in a simple and understated way.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

We turned this crumbling, dangerous porch into a favorite relaxation haven with locally made non-toxic paints, local FSC-certified wood and locally made Adirondack chairs also from FSC-certified wood. The original 1900-stained glass was preserved in the windows.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

The room that this master bedroom now occupies was previously a storage space for thirty years.  First, massive structural re-enforcements were necessary to stabilize the room, and the attic above.  New sugar beet foam insulation, the insertion of gas stoves inside the historic, shallow, formally coal-burning fireplaces, interlined curtains and new efficient Marvin windows assured a warm and efficient space.  The rug, an un-processed wool with a natural jute backing, entirely free of toxins, also warms the space physically and aesthetically.  The sea grass fan and numerous windows with fabulous views keep the room cool in the summer.  The door to the hallway was closed and chosen as the ideal indent for a king bed, complete with organic custom headboard, organic mattress and bedding and surrounding custom shelves that face each occupant.  An organic sofa, when not used for reading, doubles as the dog’s evening bed.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

The clients requested that the designer transform an unused garage into a yoga studio and guest house.  The unique two-story ceiling with clerestory windows was maintained and updated with efficient windows and local wood trim, while the pre-existing loft was transformed into a safe sleeping and play space for the couple’s son. A new modest kitchen and bath outfitted with unique, inspiring, local and natural materials, resulted in an inviting, light-filled, unpretentious, well-used, and multi-functional space.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

This residence, in need of no construction, called out for furnishings that wouldn’t compete with the strong architectural elements of the space but ones that would compliment it while having enough presence so that they would not be overly dominated by the compelling existing elements in the room. The space also needed to accommodate four young teenagers and three dogs (who like to climb on furniture). The four linen arm chairs swivel and rock to appeal to the typical teens who are always in motion.  The two-sided chaise by the window is everyone’s favorite relaxation and reading spot and two of the children will often share the piece.  It is also the favorite furniture piece in the house of the dogs.  The strong wool upholstery holds up well against pet nails and other abuses.  The colors of the room were inspired by the nearby kitchen back-splash.  A palette of varying grey tones, coupled with comfortable, upholstered furniture, softens the expanses of glass and quiets the busy room, while pops of vibrant color and the strong geometry of the furniture and cow-hide rug solidify the grouping to create an assured composition of harmony, clarity, and balance.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

This Eastlake design turn-of-the-century dockhouse was in a state of disrepair for decades and was in danger of being carried away by ice or storms. The Emmet Carter team spent 3 years restoring it to become the functional, sturdy, elegant town landmark that it once was.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

This falling down unused structure, after rehabilitation, became a well used dockhouse for storage of much water sport gear.  The hammock on the cantilevered deck is the favorite relaxation spot for the owners and visitors alike, while the upstairs space provides a private area for guests change  or relax.  The upstairs original floorboards were preserved and painted, while the downstairs floor was built from Cedar milled on and from the owners’ property.  Douglas Fir bead boards that line the walls and ceiling (preserved with a natural, non-toxic oil)  prove durable and easy-to-maintain.

After

Before and After

This is an important element of the Emmet Carter website available to show the viewer how far the designer is capable of taking a space.  We have chosen to showcase some of the more dramatic changes here so that you can see that the designer gets involved in all aspects of a renovation, new building project or addition (inside the walls and all).  In addition to designing all the interiors below, she created the construction, electric and finish plans for all of the featured spaces here that underwent construction.

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

Though the architect insisted that the existing kitchen be bumped out for a better lake view, and alternatively suggested putting it in the historic living room for an open kitchen and family space, we reminded him that we would not be disturbing the historic footprint of the Federal home and that the “family” consisted of two adults and a dog.  Therefore, though he thought the space entirely too small for a kitchen, it has been for many years the perfect size for two people who do a great deal of cooking and entertaining.  An eight-year old nephew chose the color, which reminded him of green apples and grapes. Around the green walls we added custom wheat board non-toxic cabinetry, trim with Federal details, and green granite that resembles marble. The floor is FSC beech wood.  We got the lake view by putting a second sink in the island, which faces onto the adjoining room’s lakefront windows.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

This office is part of a larger office space renovation for an educational non-profit that receives many visitors from around the country. The space was previously an apartment on the second story of a central village building. It features new efficient windows; custom local wood paneling and floors; and a locally hand-made desk, chairs and tables. The rooms reflect the local Adirondack vernacular.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

The clients wanted to expand the bedroom of this rental apartment   into the hall so we designed a plan that created a new bathroom and separate hall entrance so that the room could be part of a larger apartment space or rented alone.  Custom Adirondack local wood paneling, floors, and furniture serve as a warm reminder to the visitor of their unique location.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

This client wanted to turn an outdated, small, dark guest bath into a room that felt more spacious, bright, and inviting, while also accommodating older and handicapped visitors. Without adding any space we took out the old and cumbersome tub and expanded the shower space by stealing some unused floor space from the room. We added a shower light, and other warm efficient lights and updated the heat and venting.  The new lights, soothing sea green palette on the walls and hand-made tiles, and the glass enclosure visually enlarged the room. A local photograph of the outside lake with the same hues added to the warmth of the space and created a local context. To please the guests with physical limitations, a sturdy but elegant grab bar, a hand held shower with long hose and a generous shower seat did the job.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

This client wanted to turn an old Dairy barn into a three-bedroom guest house for visiting children, their spouses, and grandchildren.  They also wanted a gym for themselves and for their guests.  The original footprint and exterior walls were preserved while all interior walls were removed and re-configured, and the failing roof was carefully lifted and replaced. The old exterior windows were re-used for the interior walls of the gym to let light into the living room and to expand the space.  Radiant heat and new energy efficient windows, foam insulation, and wood stove ensured that the space would be efficient and comfortable in winter and summer alike.  A simple, rustic Adirondack theme was requested and durable furniture from a previous home was perfect for the space.  The result is an unpretentious and inviting space where parties abound and everyone feels welcome (see the plans in Design Process).


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

A former English professor and her well-read husband requested a more functional upstairs hallway in their historic Greek-Revival home. The tin ceiling remained, new lighting was added, and the four layers of historic wallpaper were preserved in a small corner for commemoration.  The floor-to-ceiling bookshelves were a logical first step to accommodate their large collection of books while an antique bench with custom organic cushion was enough to satisfy their young son for his reading endeavors.  As for the adults, they were surprised and delighted to learn that two upholstered, swivel reading chairs and two wall-mounted lamps were able to fit by their tall non-functioning French doors at the end of the hall.  Interlined mocha linen curtains were added to the doors to visually warm the space, block out winter drafts, and to afford privacy at night.  A formally little-used circulation space is now their favorite family room.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

We took out the dropped ceiling in this room, trimmed out the beams and added a good deal of built-ins for maximum storage and efficiency.  The solid wood bed and tables are made in nearby Vermont with a non-toxic natural oil finish while the chair is a re-upholstered antique, and the decorative dresser was made in India. All the paints are non-toxic and VOC free, all the fabrics are from natural fibers and the wool rug is completely non-toxic as well.  Since the stair to the attic is very narrow, a normal king mattress wouldn’t fit, so we purchased an organic natural rubber king one that comes in pieces, enabling easy transport up to the room.  The quiet room, surrounded by in-wall sugar beet foam insulation and the inviting bed, wrapped in soft organic fabrics, ensure that guests never want to leave.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

This bathroom seems very popular with guests.  The inspiration—from the owner’s love of the Caribbean sea and the Lake Champlain waters that lie beyond its walls—led to a water-like color scheme with recycled glass tiles and nautical fixtures.  The deep tub, hand friendly fixtures and large tiled surrounding allow easy bathing of visiting children and luxurious soaks for visiting adults (the floor features a suite of kid and adult guest rooms).  The double sink vanity features a clean white marble.  A separate third sink and toilet are down the hall allowing multiple guests access to sinks at the same time.  Everyone’s favorite feature is the recycled floor tiles, which, with rounded edges feel delightful under bare feet.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

This Federally inspired dining room was used as a wood shop by the previous owner. The Emmet Carter team designed all the custom federal-patterned trim in the room to honor the home’s original heritage.  As well, a bricked-in southern window was opened, the fireplace was restored to working condition, the mantel was dressed up with a federal wood surround and white marble; new FSC local cherry wood and an Aubusson reproduction rug grace the floors; taller, federal reproduction chairs and table and antique French case pieces enliven the room with quiet grandeur.  Additionally, new sugar beet foam insulation and green framing techniques brought the walls in by a foot and the ceiling down, but they allowed a formally drafty room to be comfortable in the winter despite brutal lake winds that beat at the panes.  Silk curtains lined with cotton English bump and historically inspired copper screens also block out the strong drafts.  The Tiffany blue color was inspired by a handful of cherished seaside paintings in the room by the owners’ two grandmothers.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

This room almost didn’t happen until the Emmet Carter team determined that a moldy crawl space, if properly excavated by hand, could become a finished basement.  A home gym and wine cellar were promptly requested. Two-foot brick walls ensure that the wine cellar remains nearly the same cool temperature year-round (no expensive air systems were needed).  The poured concrete floor was stained with a non-toxic brown stain and the wood trim and storage systems were custom-made with local FSC Douglas Fir and finished with a green linseed oil sealer.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

This basement gym began as a moldy crawl space below the living room.  When we removed the rotted living room floor, we decided that if we could excavate the foundation a new room could be created within the old foundation walls.  The space needed to be excavated by hand (see before picture above post-excavation), crumbling walls within the perimeter needed to be taken apart, and the foundation required a good deal of pointing, but in the end, the foundation became more stable and a beautiful new gym and wine cellar emerged (on the other side of the white door -see before and after images of the wine cellar in this section and see below for before and after pictures of the living room above the gym).  We poured a concrete floor over radiant heat and stained it with a dark, non-toxic product. We hired a very skilled woodworker to create the wood benches and storage bins around the room (and carefully cut the wood perimeters to fit the configurations of each stone).  The work of the space was laborious but well worth the effort to abate a mold problem and to gain much needed and usable space in the basement.  In the winter, the warmth from that space also ensures that the living room above never needs to have its heat turned on.  In the summer, the ground level space remains very cool so that no air system is needed for comfort.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

The floor of this gracious room, once a formal 19th century living room and later, in the 1950s and 60s, the pub room of a hotel, was collapsing into the foundation and so needed to be taken out and entirely re-built.  It was a laborious job but well worth the work. It is now a well-used entertaining space for small groups and large gatherings alike. The yearly 100 person dance party in the room can carry on with assurance of a sturdy base.  The detailed trim work and built-ins throughout the room were all new, customized to match existing Federal wood patterns in the home, and comprised of FSC woods.  The rugs are custom, hand made wool from Tibet; the floors are new FSC beech wood; the couches are custom and entirely organic; the upholstered chairs are sustainable from Lee; and the French chairs are antique and re-upholstered with a cotton velvet and a cotton jute batting.  The coffee table was handmade of walnut by the owner’s brother.  All the fabrics in the room are natural and organic and all the wood and paint finishes are natural and non-toxic.  Two original fireplaces transformed into gas stoves heat the room on demand for company and in-floor hydronic radiant heat stands by for additional warmth—though even in frigid winters it has never turned on because of the efficient and warm rooms that surround on all sides.  The neutral palette in the room and black and white art work let the architectural elements of the room take center stage, while elements like the textured trims and velvets invite touch and lingering.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

This eight foot wide new addition, in the footprint of an historic porch, now mirrors the existing wing on the other side of the house to add symmetry to the Federal house.  Additionally, it offers space for a bar, half bath, mudroom and staircase to the finished basement.  The double paned Marvin windows offer nice views of the lake and south yard, allow large amounts of sunlight to warm the house in winter, and large breezes to enter in the summer.  The new addition also insulates the large, historic living room.  The honed marble floors conceal efficient radiant heat, and the customized bar cabinet is recessed into the area where an exterior window once stood.  Recycled PaperStone tops the bar area and half bath vanity down the hall.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

This 1823 home took five years for the Emmet Carter team to restore.  The back ell of the house had been cut off by a previous owner who wanted less space in the home.  This left an interior wall posing as an exterior one for decades.  A poorly constructed north additon upset the classical symmetry of the house so it was re-built and another matching wing was added on the south side for balance, and to create needed space for  a mudroom, bar and new basement stairs.  A rear screened porch with upper deck off the master bedroom added some needed dimension to the rear of the home and offered two new lovely areas for relaxing.  The screened porch also has glass panels that replace the screens for all-year enjoyment.  The huge, hand-cut historic stones that marked the end of the cut-off ell (and served as its former foundation) now serve as a stone wall surround to a rear wood deck (in the former ell footprint).


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

This charming c. 1900 Arts & Crafts/Queen Anne residence was slated for demolition until the Emmet Carter folks decided to buy it and save it.  This charming residence is an exemplary fusion of classic architectural details and 21st century green contemporary lifestyle. All the original woodwork and windows were saved but the plumbing, electric, and all the inner workings were replaced.  Molded walls from years of entering rain were banished while quiet, textured fabrics and furniture and simple hand-made, non-toxic finishes allow the house’s simple, elegant character to shine.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

This bathroom was in dire condition before renovation.  Water had been leaking into the room for many years but the original turn of the century moldings and wood floors of the space were intact.  When we demolished the walls, we discovered a lovely brick façade where the chimney furnace traveled up to the roof.  We left it and the wood molding exposed and painted the original floorboards.  Formally a small bedroom, the space offered a generous amount of room for a bathroom, especially when the closet walls came down.  A large walk-in shower with hand-made Mexican tiles, a new deep soaking tub, wood blinds and lively color embolden but warm the space.  New fixtures, venting, lighting, insulation, electric and plumbing ensure that the space will function efficiently for years.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

Like the bathroom above, in the kitchen we exposed the brick wall of the furnace chimney and reworked the walls with proper insulation, new wiring and plumbing.  We had picked out local slate for the floors but discovered after removing the old vinyl tiles that a beautiful wood floor lay beneath.  We opted to sand the wood and seal it with a non-toxic protectant.  The resulting wood floor lends a linearity and warmth to the space.  The Green paint and cabinets combined with energy efficient but hard-working appliances, granite, lights and farmhouse sink meet the demands of a picky chef but in a simple and understated way.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

We turned this crumbling, dangerous porch into a favorite relaxation haven with locally made non-toxic paints, local FSC-certified wood and locally made Adirondack chairs also from FSC-certified wood. The original 1900-stained glass was preserved in the windows.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

The room that this master bedroom now occupies was previously a storage space for thirty years.  First, massive structural re-enforcements were necessary to stabilize the room, and the attic above.  New sugar beet foam insulation, the insertion of gas stoves inside the historic, shallow, formally coal-burning fireplaces, interlined curtains and new efficient Marvin windows assured a warm and efficient space.  The rug, an un-processed wool with a natural jute backing, entirely free of toxins, also warms the space physically and aesthetically.  The sea grass fan and numerous windows with fabulous views keep the room cool in the summer.  The door to the hallway was closed and chosen as the ideal indent for a king bed, complete with organic custom headboard, organic mattress and bedding and surrounding custom shelves that face each occupant.  An organic sofa, when not used for reading, doubles as the dog’s evening bed.


 

(Please click on an image to enlarge the photograph.)

The clients requested that the designer transform an unused garage into a yoga studio and guest house.  The unique two-story ceiling with clerestory windows was maintained and updated with efficient windows and local wood trim, while the pre-existing loft was transformed into a safe sleeping and play space for the couple’s son. A new modest kitchen and bath outfitted with unique, inspiring, local and natural materials, resulted in an inviting, light-filled, unpretentious, well-used, and multi-functional space.


 

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This residence, in need of no construction, called out for furnishings that wouldn’t compete with the strong architectural elements of the space but ones that would compliment it while having enough presence so that they would not be overly dominated by the compelling existing elements in the room. The space also needed to accommodate four young teenagers and three dogs (who like to climb on furniture). The four linen arm chairs swivel and rock to appeal to the typical teens who are always in motion.  The two-sided chaise by the window is everyone’s favorite relaxation and reading spot and two of the children will often share the piece.  It is also the favorite furniture piece in the house of the dogs.  The strong wool upholstery holds up well against pet nails and other abuses.  The colors of the room were inspired by the nearby kitchen back-splash.  A palette of varying grey tones, coupled with comfortable, upholstered furniture, softens the expanses of glass and quiets the busy room, while pops of vibrant color and the strong geometry of the furniture and cow-hide rug solidify the grouping to create an assured composition of harmony, clarity, and balance.


 

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This Eastlake design turn-of-the-century dockhouse was in a state of disrepair for decades and was in danger of being carried away by ice or storms. The Emmet Carter team spent 3 years restoring it to become the functional, sturdy, elegant town landmark that it once was.


 

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This falling down unused structure, after rehabilitation, became a well used dockhouse for storage of much water sport gear.  The hammock on the cantilevered deck is the favorite relaxation spot for the owners and visitors alike, while the upstairs space provides a private area for guests change  or relax.  The upstairs original floorboards were preserved and painted, while the downstairs floor was built from Cedar milled on and from the owners’ property.  Douglas Fir bead boards that line the walls and ceiling (preserved with a natural, non-toxic oil)  prove durable and easy-to-maintain.